Keaton

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KeatonMICHAEL KEATON (Jack Frost) embodies a compelling contradiction: he is one of the most popular and least predictable stars in America today. Known for his versatility, Keaton has convincingly portrayed an exceptional spectrum of lead characters.

Keaton began his career as a standup comic before gaining national recognition as the manic morgue attendant in Ron Howard's 1982 film, "Night Shift." He followed this with starring roles in the comedy "Mr. Mom" and the cult gangster spoof "Johnny Dangerously," then played a recovering mental patient in the comedy "Dream Team." In 1988, he starred concurrently as a young man battling drugs and alcohol addiction in the acclaimed drama "Clean and Sober" and as the comic yet horrifying title character in Tim Burton's wildly inventive "Beetlejuice." For both performances, he earned a Best Actor Award from the National Society of Film Critics.

KeatonKeaton made cinematic history with his dual starring performances as Bruce Wayne and the Dark Knight in Warner Bros.' worldwide blockbuster "Batman." Before returning to his Batman character in the blockbuster sequel "Batman Returns," Keaton played a deceptive sociopath in the thriller "Pacific Heights." After "Batman Returns," Keaton appeared in Shakespeare's ensemble romantic comedy, "Much Ado About Nothing," directed by Kenneth Branagh, then starred in the police drama "One Good Cop" and played a driven newspaper editor in "The Paper." Keaton next portrayed a man with a terminal illness and an infant child in the poignant "My Life"; he then starred as a political speechwriter in the romantic comedy "Speechless," and as a man too busy to live his own life in "Multiplicity."

More recently, Keaton played a vicious killer in the suspense thriller "Desperate Measures," then joined the ensemble starring cast of Quentin Tarantino's wry action drama, "Jackie Brown" and reprised that role as Federal Agent Ray Nicolet in a cameo appearance in Steven Soderbergh's "Out of Sight."

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